Two-drug combo helps adolescents with ADHD, aggression

Prescribing both a stimulant and an antipsychotic drug to children with physical aggression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), along with teaching parents to use behavior management techniques, reduces aggressive and serious behavioral problems in the children, according to researchers.

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Concussion tests' marketing outpaces scientific evidence, new review says

Computerized neurocognitive testing for concussions is widely used in amateur and professional sports, but little research over the past decade proves its effectiveness, a paper published this month says. The review updates a 2005 look at the available research on computerized neurocognitive testing. The authors still urge caution with their use and point out a need for more peer-reviewed studies.

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Key drug receptor: Atom-level simulation of a G protein-coupled receptor could lead to improved drug design

The successful atom-level simulation of a G protein-coupled receptor could lead to improved drug design, blazing the path for specialized scientific projects on cloud computer systems.

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Early detection of blinding eye disease could be as easy as scanning barcode

A new optical device puts the power to detect eye disease in the palm of a hand. The tool — about the size of a hand-held video camera — scans a patient’s entire retina in seconds and could aid primary care physicians in the early detection of a host of retinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and macular degeneration.

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Essential factor for Lyme disease transmission identified

Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease, hitchhikes in ticks for dissemination to mammalian hosts — including humans. A new article identifies HrpA, an RNA helicase, as a crucial player in the transmission from ticks to mammals. Scientists have analyzed the molecular function of the HrpA protein and explored its role in the bacterium’s complicated life cycle, in particular for transmission of the pathogen.

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Researchers generate kidney tubular cells from stem cells

Investigators have discovered a cocktail of chemicals which, when added to stem cells in a precise order, turns on genes found in kidney cells in the same order that they turn on during embryonic kidney development. The kidney cells continued to behave like kidney cells when transplanted into adult or embryonic mouse kidneys.

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Saving dollars while helping babies

Amid soaring health-care costs, nurse home visits can save health dollars while helping families, says a study. For every $1 spent on nurse home visits for newborns, $3 were saved in health expenditures. Program participants had 59 percent fewer emergency care episodes, safer home environments and lower rates of maternal anxiety.

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Inadequate pregnancy weight gain a risk factor for infant mortality

Women who do not gain enough weight during pregnancy are at increased risk of losing their baby in its first year of life, according to a new study. Gaining more weight than recommended was not a risk factor for infant mortality, but may be related to subsequent maternal health problems. Study authors urge that childbearing women have pregnancy weight gain goals specific to their BMI.

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Black-white infant mortality gap: Large, persistent, unpredictable

The unobservable factors that underpin the infant mortality gap between blacks and whites have persisted for more than 20 years and now appear to play a larger role than the observable factors, according to a new study.

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Bullying in academia more prevalent than thought

Bullying isn’t only a problem that occurs in schools or online among young people. It can happen anywhere to anyone, and a nursing scholar is shedding some light on how it is becoming increasingly common in academia.

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